Hover over images for more details.

 
  “A conceptually exciting, intellectually searching portrait of the social psychologist Stanley Milgram….Mr. Almereyda bridges the past and present with a movie that looks back at the Holocaust and toward Abu Ghraib. Peter Sarsgaard, occasionally addressing the camera and sometimes accompanied by an elephant that materializes in the room, delivers a forceful yet intimate performance that expresses his character’s sincerity and the sinister undertow of his methods. Sundance could use more movies, like “Experimenter,” that are adventurous in form and thought, not just in subject.    Manohla Dargis,  New York Times , October 16, 2015    

“A conceptually exciting, intellectually searching portrait of the social psychologist Stanley Milgram….Mr. Almereyda bridges the past and present with a movie that looks back at the Holocaust and toward Abu Ghraib. Peter Sarsgaard, occasionally addressing the camera and sometimes accompanied by an elephant that materializes in the room, delivers a forceful yet intimate performance that expresses his character’s sincerity and the sinister undertow of his methods. Sundance could use more movies, like “Experimenter,” that are adventurous in form and thought, not just in subject.

Manohla Dargis, New York Times, October 16, 2015

 

Experimenter

1:38

Premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, 2015

 

 “…Unfolds like a tragedy, gradually shedding all its armor until it winds up, naked and a little crazy, as something of a comedy. You don't have to love Shakespeare's  Cymbeline  to get swept up in the spirit of Almereyda's: With its shootouts, its subcurrents of tenderness and eroticism, its trick-or-treat mischief-making, this adaptation is brash and inventive and more than a little wild. But all this madness has a purpose: As with  Hamlet , Almereyda is most interested in testing and proving the resilience of Shakespeare, challenging us to see how it holds up in the modern universe.  Steaphanie Zacharek,  Village Voice , September 4, 2014

“…Unfolds like a tragedy, gradually shedding all its armor until it winds up, naked and a little crazy, as something of a comedy. You don't have to love Shakespeare's Cymbeline to get swept up in the spirit of Almereyda's: With its shootouts, its subcurrents of tenderness and eroticism, its trick-or-treat mischief-making, this adaptation is brash and inventive and more than a little wild. But all this madness has a purpose: As with Hamlet, Almereyda is most interested in testing and proving the resilience of Shakespeare, challenging us to see how it holds up in the modern universe.

Steaphanie Zacharek, Village Voice, September 4, 2014

Cymbeline

1:38

Premiered at the Venice Film Festival, Italy, 2014

 

The Man Who Came Out Only At Night

15 min.

Premiered at the New York Film Festival, 2013 

 

Skinningrove

15 min.

Best Non-Fiction Short at the Sundance Film Festival, 2013

Best Short at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, 2013

 

The Ogre's Feathers

20 min.

Premiered at the Rome Film Festival, Italy, 2012

 

 

 

The Great Gatsby in Five Minutes

11 min.

Premiered at the New York Film Festival, 2011

 

 

 

  “I am enthralled by  Paradise , a film whose documentary eye wanders while seeming to have great fixity of purpose just below the level of conscious apprehension.”    Jonathan Lethem, Film Comment, 2003    

“I am enthralled by Paradise, a film whose documentary eye wanders while seeming to have great fixity of purpose just below the level of conscious apprehension.”

Jonathan Lethem, Film Comment, 2003

 

Paradise

1:22

Premiered at Film Comment Selects, New York, 2009

Gotham Award Nomination for Best Documentary

 

Frontier

29 min.

Premiered at the Viennale, Vienna, 2011

 

New Orleans, Mon Amour

1:18

Premiered at the Torino Film Festival, Italy, 2008

 

  “Fascinating…  William Eggleston in the Real World  speaks for itself in roughly the same mysterious way an Eggleston photograph does: it casts more light than you expect, and deeper shadows.”    Terrence Rafferty,  New York Times , August 28, 2005          

“Fascinating… William Eggleston in the Real World speaks for itself in roughly the same mysterious way an Eggleston photograph does: it casts more light than you expect, and deeper shadows.”

Terrence Rafferty, New York Times, August 28, 2005

 

 

 

William Eggleston in the Real World

1:27

Premiered at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2005

Gotham Award Nomination for Best Documentary

 

Deadwood: E.B. Was Left Out

2005 (TV Series,1 episode) 55 min.

 “Sam Shepard invited Almereyda to film his own rehearsals for the San Francisco stage production of his autobiographical play The Late Henry Moss, featuring Nick Nolte, Sean Penn, James Gammon, and Cheech Marin…  Almereyda's judicious observation and careful editing keep Shepard's serious work with actors and honest wrestling with personal demons fascinating and instructive throughout.”  Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader, 2003

“Sam Shepard invited Almereyda to film his own rehearsals for the San Francisco stage production of his autobiographical play The Late Henry Moss, featuring Nick Nolte, Sean Penn, James Gammon, and Cheech Marin…

Almereyda's judicious observation and careful editing keep Shepard's serious work with actors and honest wrestling with personal demons fascinating and instructive throughout.”

Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader, 2003

This So-Called Disaster

1:29

Premiered at the Rotterdam International Film Festival, 2003

 

 “An uncanny pulse-taking of our technology-saturated times, where identity has become not just a salable commodity but a mass-marketed one. This singular, raggedly beautiful film, which also manages to fit concerns about detective noir, Blaise Pascal’s  Pensees  and the blues music of the late Ernie K. Doe into its svelte 89-minute form, isn’t for everyone…But it will foster a core critical contingent that will find itself transfixed and, ultimately, deeply moved by the film’s ravishing power.”  Scott Foundas, Variety, June 12, 2002

“An uncanny pulse-taking of our technology-saturated times, where identity has become not just a salable commodity but a mass-marketed one. This singular, raggedly beautiful film, which also manages to fit concerns about detective noir, Blaise Pascal’s Pensees and the blues music of the late Ernie K. Doe into its svelte 89-minute form, isn’t for everyone…But it will foster a core critical contingent that will find itself transfixed and, ultimately, deeply moved by the film’s ravishing power.”

Scott Foundas, Variety, June 12, 2002

Happy Here and Now

1:29

Premiered at CineVegas, 2002

 

  “Mr. Almereyda has created a new standard for adaptations of Shakespeare, starting with an understanding of the emotional pull of the material that corresponds with its new period and setting… The director's rigorous trimming has a boldness and vivacity that makes this version exhilarating while leaving Shakespeare's language and intent intact.”    Elvis Mitchell, The New York Times, May 12, 2000    

“Mr. Almereyda has created a new standard for adaptations of Shakespeare, starting with an understanding of the emotional pull of the material that corresponds with its new period and setting… The director's rigorous trimming has a boldness and vivacity that makes this version exhilarating while leaving Shakespeare's language and intent intact.”

Elvis Mitchell, The New York Times, May 12, 2000

 

Hamlet

1:52

Premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, 2000

 

The Rocking Horse Winner

22 min.

Premiered at The New York Film Festival, 1997

Best Short at the Hamptons International Film Festival, 1997

 

The Eternal

1:35

Premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, 1998

At Sundance

1:11

Co-directed with Amy Hobby; Premiered at the Locarno International Film Festival, Switzerland, 1995

 

 "The lushest film of the year thus far is Michael Almereyda's Nadja, a comic vampire tale, or portrait of the young as a lost tribe of bloodsuckers. Shot in shimmering, undulating black and white -- part Fisher-Price Pixelvision, part silvery 35mm -- Nadja follows the path of Dracula's moody daughter, who, discontented with the routine, intends somehow to start over, be born again."  - Georgia Brown, Village Voice, 1995  Rated #4 in the Voice's "20 Best Modern Vampire Movies, 1979 to the present" (2014)

"The lushest film of the year thus far is Michael Almereyda's Nadja, a comic vampire tale, or portrait of the young as a lost tribe of bloodsuckers. Shot in shimmering, undulating black and white -- part Fisher-Price Pixelvision, part silvery 35mm -- Nadja follows the path of Dracula's moody daughter, who, discontented with the routine, intends somehow to start over, be born again."

- Georgia Brown, Village Voice, 1995

Rated #4 in the Voice's "20 Best Modern Vampire Movies, 1979 to the present" (2014)

Nadja

1:33

Premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, 1994

 

Aliens

13 min.

Premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London, 1993

 

Another Girl Another Planet

1:02

Premiered at the Toronto international Film Festival, 1992

 

  "First-time director Michael Almeredya, who adapted the script from Mary Robison's 1981 novel OH!, has etched a disturbingly comic portrait of the nuclear family nuked....The film may be blissfully bonkers, but it also speaks tellingly of the dislocation in American life. Part fun house, part chamber of horrors, Twister emerges as outrageous, original entertainment."  Peter Travers, Rolling Stone, 1989  


"First-time director Michael Almeredya, who adapted the script from Mary Robison's 1981 novel OH!, has etched a disturbingly comic portrait of the nuclear family nuked....The film may be blissfully bonkers, but it also speaks tellingly of the dislocation in American life. Part fun house, part chamber of horrors, Twister emerges as outrageous, original entertainment."

Peter Travers, Rolling Stone, 1989
 

Twister

1:33

Nominated for an IFP Spirit Award, Best First Feature, 1989

 

A Hero of Our Time

26 min.

Premiered at the Walker Arts Center, Minnesota, 1987